Crystal Aurora Borealis – Definition

If you’re looking for a piece of crystal jewellery, you will no doubt have seen many references to ‘Aurora Borealis’, ‘AB’ etc. Many people assume ‘Aurora Borealis to be a colour in it’s own right. In fact, as a special coating finish, ‘Aurora Borealis’ is available on many of the most popular crystal colours.

The ‘Aurora Borealis’ finish, not only increases the brilliance of each crystal, this special application also produces colour changes, as a direct result of variations, in the quality of light that falls upon it.

The ‘Aurora Borealis’ coating itself, consists of a metallic finish applied to a crystal surface using water. A very thin metallic particle sheen is adhered to the glass resulting in a significant enhancement to the crystal’s overall brilliance and dramatic colour changes.

These chromatic variations are dependent on the underlying crystal colour and their intensity is affected by background light conditions. Spectral effects similar to those created when sunlight falls on oily water can also be seen.

The colour variations range through the spectrum from light, almost imperceptible, blues to the deepest warm hues.The actual visible colour changes depend greatly on the individual crystal cut, dimensions and colour choice, as well as ambient light conditions but in general, darker backgrounds, tend to produce warm ‘fire-like’ colours, oranges, yellows, gold, reds and ambers. While in contrast, ‘light’ conditions produce ethereal blues, greens, lilac, purple and tones with a sense of unbounded ‘space’. When applied to each crystal colour particular specific variations can be seen, but in all, the ‘Aurora Borealis’ finish results in a stunning and brilliant display.



Source by Tim Vogel

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